PRO & CONS – PROPOSITION I – NOVEMBER 3, 2015

 

PROPOSITION I – MISSION DISTRICT HOUSING MORATORIUM INITIATIVE

Ordinance

Placed on the ballot by an initiative petition

Requires a simple majority vote for passage

THE QUESTION:

Should the City suspend the issuance of permits on certain types of housing and business development projects in the Mission District for at least 18 months, and develop a Neighborhood Stabilization Plan for the Mission District by January 31, 2017?

BACKGROUND:

The City has seen rising rent and property values in the Mission District over the past several years. From 2006 to 2014, approximately 1,327 housing units were built in the Mission District, and 165 of those units were considered “affordable.” A majority of new housing development projects being proposed within the Mission District is market rate housing, not considered “affordable.” The Mission District has lost roughly 80 rent-controlled units per year due to Ellis Act conversions, condo conversions, and demolitions since 2006.

THE PROPOSAL:

This measure would suspend issuance of City permits on certain types of real estate development projects in the Mission District, including permits for the demolition, conversion, or construction of any housing projects with 5 or more units, and permits for the demolition, conversion, or elimination of any sites designated as a PDR use. PDR stands for businesses that produce, distribute or repair goods and automobiles.

This measure would not apply to housing projects where all units are affordable to low and moderate-income households. This measure would only apply to projects located in the Mission District (Guerrero St to the West, Highway 101 to the north, Caesar Chavez to the south, and Potrero Ave to the east).

This measure would authorize a majority of Board members to vote to extend the proposed moratorium for another 12 months, and would require the City to develop a Neighborhood Stabilization Plan by January 2017. The Plan would propose legislation, policies and funding to ensure that 50% of all new housing would be affordable to low-, moderate-, and middle-income households.

A “YES” Vote Means:  you support the suspension of permits issued by the City for certain types of real estate development projects in the Mission District for at least 18 months, and develop a Neighborhood Stabilization Plan for the Mission District by January 31, 2017.

A “NO” Vote Means: you do not support the suspension of permits issued by the City for certain types of real estate development projects in the Mission District for at least 18 months, and develop a Neighborhood Stabilization Plan for the Mission District by January 31, 2017.

 

 

ARGUMENTS IN FAVOR PROP I:

Recent growth in luxury development is changing this character by displacing businesses, artists, and residents, including nearly one third of its Latino population; further, 12% of housing units built in the Mission over the past eight years have been deemed “affordable.”

 

ARGUMENTS AGAINST PROP I:

It will not stop evictions and will prevent the development of 1,495 new homes, including hundreds of below market rate units.

 

READ PROPOSITION J

All League News